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Meeting of the Ministerial Committee on Methodology of the Movement of the Non-Aligned Countries, Caratagena de Indias, May 14-16, 1996


Address of H.E. Ernesto Samper-Pizano, President of Colombia, at the Inaugural Session of the Meeting of the Ministerial Committee on Methodology of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries

Welcome again to this legendary city of Cartagena, which since our last Summit has become the honorary capital of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries.

And welcome again to Colombia, a country whose foreign policy promotes universalization, solidarity, pluralism and co-operation.

We are holding this Meeting of the Ministerial Committee on Methodology, as we have held the various other events in the last six months since the XI Summit, as part of the mandate given to the Chairman of the Movement in Cartagena.

Since the Summit, we have been able to ratify many of the diagnoses we made then, and that were included in the Final Document and in "The Call from Colombia".

The process of globalization in the world economy has ended up by being one in which only few are winners, while the many are the losers.

To put that more precisely, what is happening in the present international economic system due to restrictive practices and the imperfections of the market, is an excluding localization of the profits in a few Countries and an evident globalization of the losses in the majority of the nations. The world of today is indeed a world-village when it comes to distributing poverty, but looks more like an exclusive country mansion, surrounded by all kinds of walls and security fences to stop the majority from coming in, when it comes to distributing wealth.

The cake of progress continues to be handed out in large slices for a few, and in crumbs for the rest. Whether some neo-liberals like it or not, we remain divided like Dives and Lazarus in the Bible.

The international financial system does not respond to our Countries’ need for funds. Capital does not search production but speculation. Foreign debt is still our sword of Damocles, hanging over our legitimate development aspirations to economic and social progress. To repay that debt, we continue to increase the social debt we have to our own people: every cent we pay for capital redemption is money taken from a hospital, from a classroom, from the glass of milk we cannot afford to give to a child in some remote rural area.

We continue to see dangerous tendencies to link trade with labour, the environment and investment.

The ‘social clause’, which is intended to level out income differentials between poor and rich Countries through tariffs, has become a bludgeon with which to tax the poor.

Adjustment policies concentrate almost entirely on macroeconomic structures, and ignore other objectives requiring greater adjustment, such as competitivity, the creation of jobs, the modernization of production, a more balanced distribution of income, the deepening of social policies and the training of human resources.

It is with concern that we see how unilateral actions have been extended, and in some cases have become extra-territorial. This poses a serious threat to the trade potential of the Developing Countries. And the extra-territorial application of domestic law is a flagrant breach of the United Nations Charter and the rules of the World Trade Organization. Unilateralism is the new name for imperialism.

In this context we, as spokesmen of the Non-Aligned Countries, proposed a short while ago, at the IX UNCTAD in South Africa that globalization must be humanized, by combining economic processes with a new attitude of solidarity. Productivity and solidarity are the magic words for the new creed of Non-Alignment.

I shall be repeating the same convictions about the world economic system, and other concerns of the Members of the Non-Aligned Movement, as expressed at the XI Summit here in Cartagena, to the Heads of State of the Group of 7 at their next meeting in Lyon, France.

We are here today to strengthen our principles and reassert our objectives of unity and solidarity among the nations of the South. Our strength will not be the sum of our balances in current account, or the aggregate of our potential in nuclear weapons or the power to impose our own terms of trade or to form cartels with our ships or our insurance companies: our strength is the strength of being together, thinking together, acting together, dreaming together and propounding our claims together.

Co-operation among the Developing Countries is not an alternative which can simply agree to take or leave. it is a genuine imperative if we want to be important interlocutors in today’s world.

If we wish to survive in the midst of anarchy around the world, co-operation between our peoples is a duty, and indeed a sine qua Non of our continuing survival as autonomous nations. The sovereignty of our nations is not a figure of speech in the interdependent world of today it is a reason for survival. The survival of the sardines, united in their defence against the shark.

Co-operation is in short, the only compass to guide the Movement along the winding and undiscovered paths of the new times.

The facts of inter-dependence and globalization do not lead to any logical conclusion that intervention is the magic formula to face the issues which concern the entire international community.

If we accept intervention, we are opposing the solution of the main issues affecting the world. Intervention means that global, cross-frontier issues will only become more serious.If we support intervention in any form, we will be condemned to remain in the past.

If we tolerate intervention, we are being simplistic about the extreme complexity of the world of the post-Cold War era.Globalization and interdependence cannot be the doors through which the specter of intervention may be allowed to enter. Rather, they should be the locks and chains to shut it out, and the best of reasons for seeking international co-operation.

We cannot and will not allow the rules of the game to be imposed on us unilaterally, when this would define the nature of many actions in the post-Cold War world. We have a duty to play an active part in setting clear guidelines to ensure that our national interests remain valid.

The world needs a new kind of co-operation, more realistic and less abstract, as the cornerstone on which we can build a genuinely new international order of greater justice and equity.

Marshal Tito was right, when he said at the first Non- Aligned Summit Conference in Belgrade in 1961, that to avoid a world conflict because of the bipolar confrontation, we would have to "walk a new, modern road, of collaboration and co-operation in international relations’.

Today, 35 years after our Movement was created, this is still our objective. In 1996 we can say that if we want to avoid setting the world on fire because of poverty, underdevelopment, injustice and inequity, we should also ask all nations to co-operate with each other. We do not ask for charity: we ask for justice, we ask for fair rules for trade, we ask for access to technology, we ask for sources of funds at reasonable prices; and we ask for respect for our sovereignty.

We need a new form of co-operation, which should be the result of consensus and negotiation between ourselves in the South, and between the South and the industrialized North; and not some supposed, but Non-existent - natural harmony in the world.

International co-operation is the setting in which we can continue to be different, without sacrificing solidarity as the principle of unity among our peoples.

  • Co-operation does not mean surrender or resignation.
  • Co-operation not means international idealism.
  • Co-operation does mean justice and peace.
  • Co-operation not only does reflect dissatisfaction with circumstance, but also promotes dynamic action in the quest for change.

We need co-operation to resolve conflicts between our members. We need co-operation, to look for concerted and balanced multilateral solutions on issues such as illicit drugs, the depredation of the environment, the violation of human rights, and migrations. We need co-operation to promote democracy, social progress, nuclear disarmament and real free trade. We need co-operation to increase investment and scientifical and technological transfers, because today’s world is not divided between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have- nots’ but between those with the know how and those without it.

If we want peace, we need to practice solidarity and co-operation and to reject unilateralism and intervention. If we want peace, we need to believe more in pluralism and tolerance and less in authoritarianism and discrimination.Undoubtedly, the views and aspirations of our founding fathers in Belgrade in 1961 are today more relevant than ever before.

The achievements of the Movement in its 35 years of history require a new beginning in the search for new and specific goals, instead of a final chapter due to lack of ideals or objectives. Far from leaving us without an agenda, the new challenges of our times have complemented our existing agenda and have indeed, made it longer.

After 35 years, we are still sailing on the same ship of principles and objectives as that on which our founders launched. And we have powerful engines: co-operation and solidarity. And we all the nations of the Developing world, without exception, will guide our course.

We must continue a 35 year tradition of being an open- door Movement. We, the nations of the South, have always had our doors open, to co-operation, open to the quest for peace, justice, equity, and open to the building of a better world.

On this anniversary of the Movement, which we will commemorate this year in New York, we must not only ratify our ideals and principles and re-launch our purposes and objectives, but also analyze and review, redefine our instruments and reappraise our methodology.

Our task is both to maintain and preserve, and to update ourselves. This task of modernization must be creative, since change by itself does not bring anyone up to date or make him more efficient.

Modernization means that we must not fear renewal, so that the Movement will become more of a reality than an appearance.

Modernization means replacing words with action. Modernization means overcoming accusation and criticism with constructive observation and practical action. Modernization means forming a new ethic of self- criticism, which will allow self-examination, and change in what we ourselves should be changing. Modernization means flexibility and efficiency in internal decision-making. We must be able to overcome the situation in which international events outstrip the reactions of the mechanisms and tools of the Movement.

It is here, most precisely, that there is a radical difference between a Movement which simply reacts to a situation as it arises, and the Movement which we all want: one which plans its strategies in advance and which is ahead of the critical moments in which conflict becomes acute or problems strike too deep.

At our last summit, the Heads of State and Government recognized the importance of increasing the inner strength of the Movement so that it could extend its global role. The purpose of this Meeting of the Committee on Methodology should not be to impose rules on the Movement. It should be to make a compilation of our practices, review their underlying criteria, and adapt them to the needs and realities of today, always respecting the need for the flexibility and tolerance which have allowed the diversity and greatness of our Movement.

A review of the international situation today confirms the need to go through with the exercise that has brought us to this Meeting.

We must strengthen our unity and the ways in which we act, so that we can influence the process of reforming the United Nations, and take an active part in it.

As a constantly growing Movement with open doors, we must have clear criteria for admission. The co-ordination of the Developing Countries in front of the multilateral agenda is one of the main objectives of our actions, and the best defence of our interests.

The strength of our Movement depends not only on the consensus we may maintain in our decisions, but also on the methods we employ to achieve them.

Ministers, Delegates, I invite you to make some firm steps forward during these two days and to advance our purpose of consolidating the Movement as a major interlocutor in the world arena.

I also invite you to continue to work in order to ensure that the end of this century will effectively be the End of History: the end of the history of injustice and poverty and of intervention in the internal affairs of others; the end of the history of conflict between fellow-men. And the end of the history of a system of international hegemony and exclusion.

Our role in history is to bring it to an end faster. And that is why we are here.

On behalf of the people of Colombia, cheerful even in adversity, hard-working, touched by magic - my people - I welcome you to Cartagena, the largest open museum in the world.

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Address of the Foreign Minister of Colombia, Rodrigo Pardo at the Inaugural Session of the Senior Officials Meeting of the Ministerial Committee on Methodology of the Non-Aligned Movement

Distinguished members of the Committee and Representatives of Member-Countries of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries.

Once again, it gives me great pleasure to offer you a most cordial welcome to Colombia, and the hospitality of this magical Caribbean city of Cartagena.

Once again, we meet to discuss and decide the role of the Non-Aligned Movement in the international system, and to review our working methods in the interests of efficiency and coherence in our meetings.

The far-reaching changes in the international system, and the natural dynamics and evolution of the ideas and positions of Member Countries of the Movement, have forced us to move forward in a number of aspects of form, and in a number of matters of substance.

In this process, our objective is to improve the co-ordination of the Movement and to make its work more agile. We also need to be more efficient and effective in the treatment of world issues which arouse the interest of the Non-Aligned Countries.

The respect for tradition and practice has been a basic component of the continuity and permanence of the Movement. That, indeed, is why there is no permanent body responsible for this history of the Movement, and also why the role of each Chairman and the part played by each Member-Country have become particularly important in ensuring that it continues to exist and to be a leading actor on the world stage.

The dissemination, study and consideration of all the positions, initiatives and proposals of the Member- Countries have maintained the Movement as an active party to the international agenda.

The promotion of wide-ranging, flexible, respectful and transparent debate on a whole range of issues is a distinctive feature of the Movement which has been a constant demonstration of the will of our Countries to find formulas for consensus and general acceptance. This mechanism gives a true picture of the Non-Aligned Movement with its complex diversity, accompanied by solidarity and unity.

On this occasion, we meet with a common interest in drawing out some of the practices of the Movement, defining them and setting them down, but never reaching the point at which they become institutionalized, thus always respecting the flexibility of the methodology of the Movement. It is precisely such flexibility which has secured our constant ability to adapt to changing circumstances in the international system, and has allowed us to seek common agreement between the Countries of the Developing world.

If we are to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries, we must assign new values to the mechanisms of action employed so far, and reactivate them.

For instance, there are mechanisms which have been created to meet immediate needs, among them the Working Groups which are Co-ordinating negotiations in the United Nations. This is a specific type of mechanism, with a specific function, and it would be easy to make it a permanent one over time to ensure that the mandate of the Movement and its objectives are achieved.

There are other series of mechanisms for studying problems and situations of special interest to the Movement, such as the Support Groups. As these groups are sufficiently flexible, and have clearly established purposes, it would be easy for them to be understood and defined as a contribution to the pursuit of our mandate.

At the same time, the Movement has created other mechanisms to co-ordinate projects and propose more ambitious goals. However, these require a greater effort in co-ordination, in order to achieve consensus and apply it. Some of these mechanisms refer to the need to encourage and enhance South-South co-operation, and so, to discover ways in which this can be done, and support them.

The Member Countries recognize the importance of South-South co-operation in all its forms and with all its components, and have made commitments on several occasions to form closer, more solid and lasting ties between our Countries, which will help to satisfy common needs in development.

The knowledge of the economic potential of each country, and of the possibilities for commercial, financial and technological exchange, can without doubt be the basis for renewal and dynamism in economic and social progress and development, always respecting the cultural and political diversity of the Movement.

This challenge is ours to face and the responsibility of rising to it depends on our political will to overcome the obstacles which have kept us apart and which have in the past hampered smooth and productive exchanges between Developing nations.

The Movement’s mechanisms of economic co-operation need to be assigned a new value and revitalized so that they will achieve their objectives, and assist us in the challenges I have mentioned.

In none of this are we proposing anything new . For many years, the Members of the Movement have been expressing the same concerns, and have suggested specific approaches to them. Our task now is to continue the discussion of some of them, and to put into practice those which we all agree should be reformulated.

This is the right moment to recover and re-launch proposals related to South-South co-operation, to consensus and to solidarity; and those which seek to enhance the unity and cohesion of our Members. We must also put into practice initiatives intended to encourage constructive dialogue with all the groups in the international system.

If we succeed in making enough progress in this, we will have kept the objectives of Bandung alive and secured new strength -for all the constructive practices and traditions which have maintained the Movement as a protagonist in the international system for the last four decades.

I, therefore, invite you to exchange and share ideas and opinions which may be useful for the evolution and modernization of the Movement. I am confident that our work will be a positive contribution to our future activities, to the consolidation of pluralism, to a stronger sense of tolerance - which has always been the greatest tribute to, and recognition of, the valuable cultural, political and economic diversity which characterizes the nations of the South.

I have no doubt that this meeting of the Committee on Methodology represents a new opportunity to make progress in the consolidation and definition of criteria, procedures and methods of action which will underpin the validity of the principles and the achievement of the objectives which inspire us. This Meeting will be a new opportunity to consolidate the foundations of unity and solidarity of our Developing nations. I invite you to make our work a tribute to our founding fathers, and to move forward towards our objective in the consolidation of peace and development in all our Countries and regions, and therefore, throughout the world.

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Cartagena Document on  Methodology

Introduction
1.  Format and Frequency of the Meetings
A. Conference of Heads of State or Government
B. Ministerial Conference
C. Extra-ordinary Ministerial Meeting
D. Ministerial Meetings in New York during the Session of the UN General Assembly
E. Ministerial Meeting of the Co-ordinating Bureau
F. Meeting of the Ministerial Committee on Methodology
G. Standing Ministerial Committee on Economic Co-operation
H. Ministerial Meetings in various fields of International Co-operation
I. Regular meetings of the Co-ordinating Bureau
J. Extra-ordinary Meetings of the Co-ordinating Bureau
K. Meetings of the working groups, task forces, contact groups and committees
L. Meetings of the "Joint Co-ordinating Committee of NAM and G-77"
2.  Decision Making
A. Consensus
B. Guidelines for promoting consensus
3. Criteria for Admission
A. Members
B. Observers
C. Guests
4. Co-ordination
A. The Co-ordinating Bureau
B. Co-ordination of the Co-ordinating Bureau and Role of the Chair
C. Working Groups, Contact Groups, Task Forces and Committees
D. Non-Aligned Security Council Caucus
E. Joint Co-ordinating Committee
F. Co-ordination of Non-Aligned Countries in other United Nations Centres
5. Enhancement of the Role of the Movement
6. Documentation
7. Annex


Introduction

The Heads of State or Government of the Non-Aligned Movement in the Summit Conference held in Cartagena de lndias, Colombia, on 18-20 October 1995, recognized that it is essential to increase inner strength for enhancing the role of the Movement. They decided to introduce a rotating three year duration chairmanship of the Ministerial Committee on Methodology, which they considered would provide impetus to improving further the working methods and efficiency of the Movement.

In this regard they recalled the early adoption of criteria for the admission of new members, observers and guests. They reaffirmed that the enhancement of the role of the Movement should be a constant process and considered that the Ministerial Committee of Methodology should continue to intensify its activities for a thorough and extensive examination of several aspects related to the structure and modalities of the Non-Aligned Movement. They recommended that the Ministerial Committee meets early 1996, to consider ways and means for enhancing the role of the Movement in the light of recent changes in the international situation.

The Co-ordinating Bureau in New York, through its Working Group on Methodology chaired by Colombia as Chairman of the Movement, met on seventeen occasions to consider a working paper submitted by Colombia. Thorough consultations were held with the members of the Movement on this paper. The Committee met in Plenary in Cartagena de Indias from 15 to 16 May, 1996.

1.     Format and Frequency of the Meetings

As has been the practice, the high level meetings of the Movement are: Summit Conferences, Ministerial Conferences, Ministerial Meetings in New York during the regular Session of the UN General Assembly, Extra-ordinary Ministerial Meetings, Ministerial Meetings of the Co-ordinating Bureau, meetings of the Ministerial Committee on Methodology, meetings of the Standing Ministerial Committee on Economic Co-operation and Ministerial meetings in various fields of international co-operation.

There are other meetings of NAM such as the meetings of the Co-ordinating Bureau in New York and the meetings of the various working groups, task forces, contact groups and committees which are held at different levels.

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A. Conference of Heads of State or Government

The Summit Conference of Heads of State or Government is the highest decision making authority of the Movement. The existing practice of holding the Summit Conference every three years should be maintained. The Summit should be held at least one month before the regular Session of the General Assembly. The Programme for the Summit should include a formal ceremony for the handing over of the Chairmanship.

The decisions of the Summit should be action-oriented. The format of a general debate should also be continued. There will be an indicative time limit for statements in the Plenary as recommended by the Co-ordinating Bureau.

The Co-ordinating Bureau in New York prior to the conference, should if possible, recommend the composition of the Bureau in order to be part of the Bureau of the Conference, the Member State should be represented at the Head of State or Government level.

Senior Officials and Ministerial meetings which are preparatory to the Summit Conference, should be maintained. The Summit will have two committees, one for political issues and another for economic and social issues. In order to facilitate finalizing the drafts of the main documents, the committees can begin their work informally during the Senior Officials Meeting. The host country should chair these committees until their Chairmen are elected.

The meetings may be structured in such a way as to allow for the holding of informal bilateral consultations among Heads of delegation.

B. Ministerial Conference

The Ministerial Conference is held with the purpose of reviewing the developments and implementation of decisions of the preceding Summit, to prepare for the following one, and to discuss matters of urgency.

These Conferences should be convened 18 months after the Summit Conference. When the Conference is hosted and chaired by a Member of NAM who is not the Chairman of the Movement, the NAM Chairman should be granted a seat as Ex-officio member of the Bureau.

There should be a Senior Officials Preparatory Meeting prior to the Conference. The practice of having political and economic and social working groups will be maintained. These working Groups may begin their work informally during the Senior Officials Meeting and the host country shall chair them until the Chairmen are elected.

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C. Extra ordinary Ministerial Meeting

Extra-ordinary Ministerial meetings should be convened only when necessary upon recommendation of the Co-ordinating Bureau, to address specific matters. The agenda should be confined to these matters.

D. Ministerial Meetings in New York during the Session of the UN General Assembly

As has been the practice, the Ministerial Meeting in New York will be held at the beginning of the regular Session of the UN General Assembly. To ensure the largest participation of Ministers of Foreign Affairs the meeting should be held soon after the opening session of the General Assembly.

The meeting should focus on the items of the Agenda of the General Assembly that are of major importance to the Movement. Following the meeting, a final communique shall be issued by the Ministers with the view to providing members of the Movement with guidance. The final communique should concentrate on substantive issues of the Agenda.

E. Ministerial Meeting of the Co-ordinating Bureau

These meetings should be restricted to preparations for the Summit and, if deemed necessary, to consider issues of major importance to the Movement.

F. Meeting of the Ministerial Committee on Methodology

All NAM members are to be members of the Ministerial Committee on Methodology. Bearing in mind that the examination of the structure and modalities of the Non-Aligned Movement is an ongoing process, meetings of the Committee on Methodology at Ministerial level should be held as necessary upon a decision by the Summit or the Ministerial Conference. The meeting of the Ministerial Committee will be chaired by the Chairman of the Movement.

G. Standing Ministerial Committee on Economic Co-operation

It is necessary to revitalize the Standing Ministerial Committee on Economic Co-operation in order to strengthen South-South Co-operation reactivate the dialogue between developed and Developing Countries, and enhance the role of the United Nations, particularly the General Assembly, in international co-operation for development. The Standing Ministerial Committee should meet as frequently as necessary upon the recommendation of the Co-ordinating Bureau.

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H. Ministerial Meetings in various fields of International Co-operation

Consistent with the mandates given by the Conference of Heads of State or Government, the meetings at the ministerial level shall be held on such issues as information, culture, agriculture, and external debt.

I. Regular meetings of the Co-ordinating Bureau

All NAM members are to be members of the Co-ordinating Bureau. The Bureau is the forum in which the Movement co-ordinates its actions within the United Nations. Regular meetings of the Co-ordinating Bureau should be held on a monthly basis, at Ambassadorial level. An agenda, containing the items to be considered, will be circulated in advance.

J. Extra-ordinary Meetings of the Co-ordinating Bureau

The extra-ordinary meetings of the Co-ordinating Bureau will take place in exceptional cases which call for urgent consideration.

K. Meetings of the working groups, task forces, contact groups and committees

All the existing working groups, task forces, contact groups and committees as included in the Annex make considerable contributions to the Movement. The working groups and above mentioned mechanisms should meet as often as necessary. Due consideration should be given to avoid overlapping of meetings.

L. Meetings of the "Joint Co-ordinating Committee of NAM and G-77"

JCC meetings should be held in accordance with the document entitled "Terms of Reference of the JCC".

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2.     DECISION MAKING

The decisions regarding consensus of the VI Summit and those contained in the reports of the Ministerial Committee on Methodology presented to the IX and X Summits are still valid.

A. Consensus

The practice of the Movement has been to make all decisions by consensus. Consensus has enhanced the solidarity and unity of the Movement. This practice should be maintained insofar as it presupposes understanding of and respect for different points of view, including disagreement and implies mutual accommodation on the basis of which agreement can emerge by a sincere process of adjustment among member nations in the true spirit of Non-Alignment.

The concept of consensus that currently exists in NAM should be maintained and the present method of conducting Non-Aligned Meeting which allows for broad consultations prior to the meeting and extensive debates in the meetings themselves should be continued as it contributes to the broadening of the area of agreement and thereby strengthening the unity of the Movement.

It is noted that consensus, while signifying substantial agreement, does not require or imply unanimity. In this regard, consensus and the methods of promoting it as enunciated by the Chairman in the 1973 Preparatory Committee of Non-Aligned Countries for the Non-Aligned Summit in Algiers and the relevant decision of the Sixth Summit Conference in Havana in 1979, are still valid.

On sensitive issues particular attention should be paid to openness and the holding of extensive consultations with the broadest possible participation. The Bureau of the Meeting, with its representative capacity, should render its assistance. Reservations should be kept to the minimum. Consensus decisions thus arrived at will be more easily implemented and will enhance the credibility and the effectiveness of the Movement. Every effort should be made so that the positions of the Non-Aligned Countries in different forums be consistent with the positions of the Movement. Member Countries should lend full support to the institutions created by consensus decisions of the Movement.

B. Guidelines for promoting consensus

The guidelines adopted by the VI Summit will continue to be applied when the extent of the disagreement indicates the absence of consensus.

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3.     CRITERIA FOR ADMISSION

A. Members

The main criterion for the admission of new members should be the adherence to and respect for the principles and objectives of the Movement.

The aspiring country should have adopted an independent policy based on the coexistence of States with different political and social systems, and on Non- Alignment, in line with the Ten Bandung Principles which are the foundation of the Movement.

The Ten Bandung Principles are as follows:

  1. Respect for fundamental human rights and for the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations.
  2. Respect for the sovereignty and territorial integrity of all nations.
  3. Recognition of the equality of all races and of the equality of all nations, large and small.
  4. Abstention from intervention or interference in the internal affairs of another country.
  5. Respect for the right of each nation to defend itself singly or collectively, in conformity with the Charter of the United Nations.
  6. a) Abstention from the use of arrangements of collective defence to serve the particular interests of any of the big powers.
    b) Abstention by any country from exerting pressures on other Countries.
  7. Refraining from acts or threats of aggression or the use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any country.
  8. Settlement of all international disputes by peaceful means, in conformity with the Charter of the United Nations.
  9. Promotion of mutual interests and co-operation.
  10. Respect for justice and international obligations.

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The aspiring country should also adhere to the principles and purposes of the Movement which have been reaffirmed by the Heads of State or Government in the XI Summit such as independence, territorial integrity and sovereignty of States, the attainment of general and complete disarmament under effective international control, the right of peoples under colonial or other forms of alien domination or foreign occupation to realize their right to self-determination, equality among nations, full respect for international law, pacific settlement of disputes, the democratization of international relations, economic and social development, an equitable international economic order, the development of human resources, the protection and promotion of all human rights and fundamental freedoms, including the right to development, and the co-existence of different systems, cultures and societies. Solidarity with the Movement shall be considered as an additional criterion for admission of new members and will be assessed in light of support for NAM initiatives and proposals.

Procedure for admission

A country wishing to become a Member of the Movement, should submit a written application by its Head of State/Government or Foreign Minister, addressed to the Chair of the Movement, who shall then circulate it to the Members of NAM.

The application should be submitted within a reasonable period of time prior to the Summit or the Ministerial Conference in which a decision will be made on that application. The Co-ordinating Bureau should consider the application and if no objections are expressed, recommend the admission to the Summit or the Ministerial Conference. Further consultations should be held if the application does not gather consensus within the Co-ordinating Bureau. Ministerial and Summit Conferences should only consider admissions recommended by the Co-ordinating Bureau.

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B. Observers

Within the framework of the need to promote the opening of the Movement to the contributions of other actors in the international arena, the current practice of admitting states as observers to the NAM meetings should be maintained. States which fulfill criteria for admission as members will have the option of applying for observer status. Observers may attend and, with the Bureau’s permission, address the Plenary of a Summit Conference or Ministerial meeting. They shall not participate in Committees nor in the meetings of NAM Working Groups, Contact Groups or Task Forces. The procedure for admission of members will apply for admission of observers.

C. Guests

Interested States, Inter-governmental Organizations and relevant Non-governmental Organizations may be invited as Guests to the Summit and Ministerial Conferences. Nevertheless, there will be no permanent guest status. Guests will be invited on an ad-hoc basis to each Summit and Ministerial Conference. The invitation will be issued by the host country after due consideration by the Co-ordinating Bureau. The current guests of the Movement are to be included in the list provided by the Co-ordinating Bureau. Guests shall only attend the opening and closing ceremonies of the Conference and do not have the right to attend and participate in the deliberations.

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4.    CO-ORDINATION

This section is aimed at improving the co-ordination and functioning of the existing working groups, contact groups, task forces and committees of NAM, in order to promote the process of achieving a commonality of positions and interests of the Non-Aligned Countries and speaking with one voice in international meetings and negotiations.

A. The Co-ordinating Bureau

The Co-ordinating Bureau is the focal point for co-ordination and should continue to act as such. The Bureau should review and facilitate the harmonization of the work of the NAM Working Groups, Contact Groups, Task Forces and Committees. In the Cartagena Final Document the Heads of State or Government expressed appreciation for the important and active role being played by the Co-ordinating Bureau in New York and its Working Groups and Drafting Groups. They were also convinced that such a role should be further intensified to meet the rapidly changing needs in the international context, including the emergence of new issues of great concern to the Movement. The Heads of State or Government, therefore, entrusted the Co-ordinating Bureau with the task of intensifying its actions to further strengthen co-ordination and mutual co-operation among Non-Aligned Countries, including unified action in the United Nations and other international fora on issues of common concern.

B. Co-ordination of the Co-ordinating Bureau and Role of the Chair

The Chairman has the responsibility of leading and Co-ordinating the activity of NAM within the United Nations and, as appropriate, in other international fora. Besides the Co-ordinating Bureau, the Chairman may also preside over other NAM mechanisms as necessary. As has been the practice some working groups could be presided over by other members.

C. Working Groups, Contact Groups, Task Forces and Committees

All NAM Working Groups, Contact Groups, Task Forces and Committees will remain active and meet as often as necessary. In the fulfilment of their mandates due regard must be paid to co-ordination, efficiency and preparedness.

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D. Non-Aligned Security Council Caucus

In the Cartagena Summit, the Heads of State or Government called for the need to continue and enhance the co-ordination including the possibility of holding consultations, on a regular basis, between Members of the NAM Caucus and the other Members of the Movement through the Co-ordinating Bureau. It is necessary that the NAM Countries elected to the Council and who form the NAM Caucus constantly strive to adopt unified positions, and that the decisions and the positions of NAM as adopted at its Summits and Ministerial Conferences and by the Co-ordinating Bureau be properly reflected by them in the Security Council, without prejudice to their sovereign rights.

The Caucus has also an important role to play in promoting transparency and democratization of the working methods of the Security Council through its participation, inter alia, in the Security Council Working Group on Procedures and Documentation and in the Sanctions Committee.

The Chairman of the Co-ordinating Bureau in New York should attend and address the Security Council on matters of particular importance to members of the Movement. To enlarge the scope of co-ordination, the Chairman of the Co-ordinating Bureau may, at the invitation of the Non- Aligned Security Council Caucus, attend the Meetings of the Caucus.

The Chairman of the Co-ordinating Bureau should hold regular meetings with each co-ordinator of the Non-Aligned Security Council Caucus with a view to being briefed on the work of the Council and in turn, to convey to the Caucus coordinator the positions of the Movement. Similarly, the Caucus co-ordinator should keep the Chairman apprised of up coming discussions and issues of general importance to the Movement.

The Co-ordinator of the Non-Aligned Security Council Caucus should brief periodically the Movement through the Co-ordinating Bureau.

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E. Joint Co-ordinating Committee

The Heads of State and Government recognized in Cartagena the importance of co-ordination and co-operation between the NAM and the Group of 77 in promoting the interest of Developing Countries in international fora.

F. Co-ordination of Non-Aligned Countries in other United Nations Centres

Bearing in mind that co-ordination in New York has proved indispensable and valuable, the Chairman of the Movement will give expeditious consideration to the establishment of similar arrangements of Non-Aligned Countries in all United Nations centres and international organization headquarters. The establishment of these arrangements would further facilitate co-ordination and co-operation with the Co-ordinating Bureau and enhance the role of the Movement in international fora.

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5.     ENHANCEMENT OF THE ROLE OF THE MOVEMENT

At the Cartagena Summit the Heads of State or Government expressed their satisfaction at the current trend of revitalization in the activities of the Non-Aligned Movement and stressed that such a trend should be maintained and encouraged. They also concurred in particular to evolve the mechanism for enhancement of the role of the Non-Aligned Movement in conformity with changes in the international situation so that the Movement will be able to respond effectively and expeditiously to the current challenges on the basis of positions agreed by its Members. They underscored the role that the Movement has to play in the United Nations and the need to enhance its participation in all United Nations Bodies.

In keeping with the mandate of Cartagena, the Movement should enhance its unity and cohesion and co-ordinate positions of Member Countries towards major international issues, with a view to strengthening their negotiating power vis-a-vis the developed Countries. In this regard, it is essential to widen the scope of agreement, expand its area of action, set clearer criteria and procedures, and develop the principle of solidarity among the members of the Movement. A united and cohesive Movement would be able to project its influence on the global scenario with greater force and effectiveness.

The Ministerial Committee recalled the decision of the Cartagena Summit to mandate the Co-ordinating Bureau to study further the question of a mechanism for peaceful settlement of disputes between Member States, including proposals made and positions expressed at the Summit and to report to the Committee on Methodology. They noted that this study has yet to be submitted.

The promotion of the inner strength of the Movement should benefit from concrete steps with the view to revitalise South-South Co-operation, inter alia, by implementation of relevant decisions of the XI Summit and examination/consideration by the appropriate body of all other relevant proposals conducive to this end. Additionally, while preserving its own identity, the Movement should seek constructive dialogue with developed Countries, including the members of the Group of 7, for international co-operation and promote the interests of the South in multilateral negotiations with the developed Countries.

The Ministerial Committee of Methodology has continued an extensive examination on aspects related to the structure and modalities of the Movement in the understanding that the enhancement of the role of the Movement is a continuing process based on the fulfilment of the mandates of the Summit and Ministerial Conferences and Meetings of the Movement. The Non-Aligned Movement should continue to explore ways and means of enhancing its role in a rapidly changing international environment, and in this regard, the meeting requested the Co-ordinating Bureau to establish a Working Group on the Enhancement of the Role of the Movement.

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6.     DOCUMENTATION

Documents should be concise, Non-repetitive and succinct, highlighting issues of particular importance or urgency on issues for which the meeting was convened. Emphasis should be placed on practical, action-oriented measures that could be implemented. The practice of issuing separate appeals or declaration or other documents on important issues should be maintained.

The documents of Summit Conferences, which are the supreme organ of the Movement, should, while remaining comprehensive, be condensed. Every effort should be made to avoid repetition.

The document for the Ministerial Conference that takes place between two Summits should focus on reviewing the implementation of Recommendations, Decisions and Action Programmes of continuing relevance, and on dealing with developments of particular importance or urgency for the Movement, since the previous Summit. It should not duplicate the final document of the Summit.

Documents for "Extra-ordinary and other Ministerial Meetings,, should be limited to the topic for which the Meeting is convened.

Co-ordinating Bureau meetings in New York may continue issuing Communiques.

Documents concerning the Action Programme for Economic Co-operation should be carefully reviewed in order to ensure that it concerns only those areas where co-operation is taking place or is realistically possible in the short and medium run.

The preparation of all documents should be the responsibility of the host country and should be the object of the widest possible consultations. Host Countries should aim at circulating the first draft as early as possible and in any event not later than one month before the Meeting.

The Report of the Rapporteur General of the Summit Conference and Ministerial Meetings should be made available together with the main documents.

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7.     Annex

Current NAM Working Groups, Contact Groups, Task Forces and Committees:

  1. NAM High-Level Working Group for the Restructuring of the United Nations (Chaired by Chairman of NAM).
  • NAM Working Group for the Restructuring of the Security Council (Chaired by Egypt).
  • NAM Drafting Groups of the NAM High-Level Working Group for the Restructuring of the United Nations dealing with the Supplement to an Agenda for Peace:
  • NAM Drafting Group on UN Imposed Sanctions (Co-ordinator: India).
  • NAM Drafting Group on Preventive Diplomacy and Peace-Making (Co-ordinator: Zimbabwe).
  • NAM Drafting Group on Post Conflict Peace- Building (Co-ordinator: Egypt).
  • NAM Drafting Group on Co-ordination (Coordinator: Colombia).
  1. NAM Working Group on Human Rights (Chaired by Malaysia).
  2. NAM Working Group on Peace-Keeping Operations (Chaired by Thailand).
  3. Ministerial Committee on Methodology (Chaired by Chairman of NAM).
  4. NAM Working Group of the Co-ordinating Bureau on Methodology (Chaired by Colombia).
  5. NAM Working Group on Disarmament (Chaired by Indonesia).
  6. Committee on Palestine (Chaired by Chairman of NAM).
  7. Contact Group on Cyprus (Chaired by Algeria).
  8. Task Force on Somalia (Chaired by Chairman of NAM).
  9. Task Force on Bosnia and Herzegovina.
  10. Non-Aligned Security Council Caucus.
  11. Coordinator Countries of the Action Programme for Economic Co-operation (APEC).
  12. Standing Ministerial Committee for Economic Co-operation (Chaired by Chairman of NAM).
  13. Joint Co-ordinating Committee -JCC- (Chaired by Chairman of G-77 and Chairman of NAM).

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Closing Address of the Minister of Foreign Relations of Colombia, Rodrigo Pardo, at the Meeting of the Ministerial Committee on Methodology of the Movement of the Non-Aligned Countries

Ministers, Ambassadors and Delegates

I offer you my sincere tribute for your arduous work, which has brought a successful conclusion to this Ministerial Meeting on Methodology.

I would also like to thank you for having responded to our call to this meeting. With it, we continue to make progress in the mandates given in the recent Summit of Heads of State or Government.

This work of compilation is of the greatest importance, and is particularly opportune, as we prepare to celebrate in New York the 35 years of the foundation of the Movement.

The methodology of the Movement - all matters related to decision-making, mechanisms for action and co-ordination, and criteria for the admission of members, observers and guests - should evolve hand in hand with the evolution of the Movement over the years, and in line with events in the international system which have a bearing on the definition of our priorities and objectives. The best guarantee that the Non-Aligned Movement can have that it will remain valid is constructive change and adaptation, always shunning rigidity. The only immovable elements of the Non-Aligned Movement must be the principles with which we were founded. As President Ernesto Samper so rightly said yesterday, "our task is to maintain and preserve, at the same time as bringing ourselves up to date". Without a doubt, the validity of the objectives and principles of our founders has been fully reasserted, with the express inclusion of the Bandung decalogue as basic criterion of acceptance and practice for nations aspiring to join the Non-Aligned Family.

Another element of fundamental importance in this Meeting has been the reaffirmation of certain aspects of our traditional practice of consensus. It has been made clear that consensus does not presupposes the exclusion of variety in the points of view of Members. But its strength lies in the fact that it represents a guarantee of diversity of opinion, and secures the unity and cohesion needed to enhance the Movement.

Variety is a driving force of Non-Alignment, not a brake on its progress. Discussion and debate will always be constructive. And the key to the reason why for we have for decades succeeded in combining diversity with unity and variety with cohesion is the practice of consensus. Consensus is our guarantee of a future. Now that we have concluded our discussions of the mechanism of consensus as a synonym of unanimity, with success - and naturally, with consensus - we can be sure that many of our actions and decisions will be effective; and we will avoid past frustrations which came from the disregard of agreements made and substantial majorities in discussion. We have thus overcome the ghost of the veto and the hazards of mandatory unanimity.

President Samper reminded us that "our strength is the strength of being together, thinking together, acting together, dreaming together, and propoundig our claims together". This is precisely one of the most important elements now embodied in our final document. Unity, to promote co-operation. Cohesion between our Countries, when we have to defend our sovereignty and reject intervention. Solidarity, as the alternative to unilateralism. Solidarity, unity and cohesion among the Non-Aligned Countries, to promote equity, to seek fair rules for trade, access to technology, and sources of finance at reasonable cost.

There is no doubt, as President Samper also said, "Co-operation is the setting in which we can continue to be different, without sacrificing solidarity as the Principle of Union between Our Peoples".

Now that we have successfully completed this Meeting of the Ministerial Committee on Methodology, we must continue to perform the mandate of Cartagena to the Chairman of the Movement. As President Samper announced at the opening of this Meeting, the Chairman will be transmitting all the concerns of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries to the Meeting of Heads of State of the Group of 7, as voiced at the XI Summit here in Cartagena, and as now embodied also in "The Call from Colombia".

I would like to thank all Ministers and delegates, the Cartagena authorities, the administration group and the Technical Secretariat, our team at the Colombian Mission in New York and all the officials of our Ministry of Foreign Relations with us here, in contributing to the success of this meeting for the new international commitment of Colombia and of the entire Movement of Non-Aligned Countries.

I, therefore, close this Meeting by repeating my conviction that the strength of our Movement is directly linked to the strength of co-operation, unity, cohesion, solidarity, our ability to adapt to changes in international circumstance. Our watchword is clear: adapt and change to gain strength. Adjust our methods and reaffirm our principles, to move forward into the future.

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Updated: 21 September 2001